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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of The ecological and physiological control of water loss in snakes found in the catalog.

The ecological and physiological control of water loss in snakes

by Thomas Henry Krakauer

  • 86 Want to read
  • 2 Currently reading

Published by University of Florida in [Gainesville] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Snakes,
  • Physiology

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesWater loss in snakes.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 57 leaves
    Number of Pages57
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24830311M
    OCLC/WorldCa13272884

    Many reptiles live in dry areas where finding adequate drinking water is difficult. Water is essential to cellular function, and therefore to health. Cells shrivel and die without enough water. Reptile adaptations allow them to get most, if not all, of the water they need from the food that they eat. Specifically, changes in how reptiles. Since snakes aren't always the top predator, they can become prey for higher that role in the web of life, they pass the bounty of their prey's population boom up the food chain. When a large prey population attracts and sustains a large snake population, those snakes become plentiful prey for birds like hawks and herons, or mammals like skunks and raccoons.

    LILLYWHITE, H.B. Behavior and physiology: An ecological and evolutionary viewpoint on the energy and water relations of ectothermic amphibians and reptiles. Chapter 1, pp. 1–39 in Amphibian and Reptile Adaptation and Environment: Interplay between Physiology and Behavior, D.V. Andrade, C.R. Bevier, J.E. de Carvalho (Eds.), CRC Press. Abstract Dehydration and procurement of water are key problems for vertebrates that have secondarily invaded marine environments. Sea snakes and other marine reptiles are thought to remain in water balance without consuming freshwater, owing to the ability of extrarenal salt glands to excrete excess salts obtained either from prey or from drinking seawater by:

    The fossil record of snakes is relatively poor because snake skeletons are typically small and fragile making fossilization uncommon. Fossils readily identifiable as snakes (though often retaining hind limbs) first appear in the fossil record during the Cretaceous period. The earliest known true snake fossils (members of the crown group Serpentes) come from the marine simoliophiids, the oldest Class: Reptilia. A potential physiological tradeoff exists between thermoregulation and water balance. • We studied the effects of physiological state on water loss and metabolism in a snake. • We determined if microclimate preferences were adjusted to reduce water loss. • Physiological state influenced water loss, metabolism, and microclimate preference. •Cited by:


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The ecological and physiological control of water loss in snakes by Thomas Henry Krakauer Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ecological and physiological control of water loss in snakes. Krakauer, Thomas Henry, Type. Book Material. Published material. Publication info [Gainesville]University of Florida, Notes: Manuscript copy. Thesis - University of Florida. Vita.

Subjects. loss(flowratexwatercontent).Ratesofwaterlosscalculated from the hygrometerwerewithin 10 percent ofthe ratescalculated from V7eight chsngeof a container of waterplaced inthe system. THE ECOLOGICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WATER LOSS IN SNAKES By Thomas Henry Krakauer August, Chairman: Brian K.

McNab Major Department: Zoology The cutaneous and respiratory water loss of Natrix fasciata pictiventris, N. compressicauda and Thamnophis sauritus were measured using a flowing air system and a dew-point hygrometer. The ecological and physiological control of water loss in snakes.

by Thomas Henry Krakauer. Share your thoughts Complete your review. Tell readers what you thought by rating and reviewing this book. Rate it. Digestion is likely even less constraining for water balance because water loss is low and because snakes might rely on water content of the prey to maintain water balance (but see).

Microclimate selection buffers physiological constraints and has been reported in a Cited by: Physiological Ecology (all pages, liters, and kilograms of it!) is a comprehensive yet surprisingly accessible treatment of a topic that is the linchpin for biologists of many stripes So if animals and food webs are central to your interests, you should read this book."-- Cited by: Temperature, Physiology, andtheEcology of Reptiles RAYMOND B.

HUEY Department of Zoology, University of Washington, Seattle, U.S.A. There is a great mass of information available concerning temperature as an ecological factor, but its actual operation is sometimes difficult to evaluate. HISTORICAL VIEWS OF TEMPERATURE AND REPTILIAN ECOLOGYFile Size: KB.

Download Citation | Skin resistance to evaporative water loss in reptiles: A physiological adaptive mechanism to environmental stress or a phyletically dictated trait.

| Rates of cutaneous water. However, when access to water is limited, ungulates must 'trade off' osmoregulation (control of body water) with thermoregulation (control of body temperature; Hetem et al., ) and an increase. orative water balance by reductions in water loss from activity, exposure to wind, and temperature control, or by increases in water gain from habitat and food selection, but water limitation.

The physiological effects of food limitation on snakes can be appreciated both by controlled studies of individuals and wild populations of snakes. Here we summarize morphological, physiological, and biochemical responses to food limitation Cited by: Rates of water loss were measured in two aberrant scaleless water snakes, Natriu sipedon, and in six normal animals.

Pulmocutaneous water loss of the scaleless animals was equal to or less than that of the controls at 20, 27, and 34°C. The thermal dependence of pulmocutaneous water loss in all snakes was low (Q, = ).

Initial Den Location by Neonatal Prairie Rattlesnakes: Functions, Causes, and Natural History in Chemical Ecology I.,The Ecological and Physiological Control of Water Loss in Snakes, Ph.

Thesis, University of Florida, Gainesville. King M.B., Lindstedt S.L., Gern W.A. () Initial Den Location by Neonatal Prairie Rattlesnakes Cited by:   Water loss is a significant stress for spiders. Paraphysa parvula shows an evaporative water loss 10 times more than usual when the temperature approaches 40°C and the participation of book lungs in this loss is about 60%.

This species and others show seasonal changes in water loss accounted for by changes in cuticle by: the clean water act was first passed in the united states in and has been amended several times since then. Describe two specific provisions of this legislation.

Ecology (from Greek: οἶκος, "house", or "environment"; -λογία, "study of") is a branch of biology concerning interactions among organisms and their biophysical environment, which includes both biotic and abiotic components. Topics of interest include the biodiversity, distribution, biomass, and populations of organisms, as well as cooperation and competition within and between species.

Sturkie's Avian Physiology is the classic comprehensive single volume on the physiology of domestic as well as wild birds. The Sixth Edition is thoroughly revised and updated, and features several new chapters with entirely new content on such topics as migration, genomics and epigenetics.

Nature. May 18;() Ecological correlation of water loss in burrowing reptiles. Krakauer T, Gans C, Paganelli CV. PMID:Cited by: This book, first published in and here reprinted with a new foreword by the authors, is still the most comprehensive survey of snake biology available in a single volume.

Authoritative and comprehensive in scope, this important book offers herpetologists, biologists and others interested in the study of snakes a broad survey of snake 2/5(1). Amphibians are the extant descendants of the first vertebrate class to successfully colonize terrestrial environments; hence they occupy a unique position between fish and reptiles.

Amphibian skin provides essentially no resistance to evaporative water loss, and consequently daily water turnover rates are an order of magnitude greater than in other terrestrial vertebrate groups.

The highly derived morphology and astounding diversity of snakes has long inspired debate regarding the ecological and evolutionary origin of both the snake total-group (Pan-Serpentes) and crown snakes (Serpentes).

Although speculation abounds on the ecology, behavior, and provenance of the earliest snakes, a rigorous, clade-wide analysis of snake origins has yet to be attempted, in part Cited by: Water snake, (subfamily Natricinae), any of about species of semiaquatic snakes belonging to 38 genera (family Colubridae).Water snakes feed in or near water, and some leave aquatic environments only to bask in the sun or breed.

Water snakes are characterized by stout bodies with strongly keeled scales and triangular heads. They are primarily distributed in the Northern Hemisphere.Range Extent. Score G - , km squared (ab, square miles). Commentsquare Kilometers from Natural Heritage Program range maps.

Long-term Trend. Score E - Relatively Stable (±25% change). Comment Habitat is likely stable within +/- 25% since European settlement, the increasing in stock ponds may have increased the amount of habitat for this .